Publications

  • Featured
    Date published: 10/17/2014

    Confronting the Legacy of Political Violence in Lebanon: An Agenda for Change

    This document presents wide-ranging recommendations for political and social reforms in Lebanon developed by a consortium of Lebanese civil society actors, as part of an ICTJ project. Directed at Lebanese authorities, the recommendations address the well-documented and widespread violations committed against civilians in Lebanon since the beginning of the civil war in 1975, including killings, enforced disappearance, displacement, torture, and illegal detention. If followed, it is hoped these measures will help to foster greater public trust in state institutions and curb Lebanon’s ongoing vulnerability to political violence.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 10/17/2014

    How People Talk About the Lebanon Wars: A Study of the Perceptions and Expectations of Residents in Greater Beirut

    Author: Romesh Silva, Nader Ahmad, Nada Al Maghlouth

    This document presents wide-ranging recommendations for political and social reforms in Lebanon developed by a consortium of Lebanese civil society actors, as part of an ICTJ project. Directed at Lebanese authorities, the recommendations address the well-documented and widespread violations committed against civilians in Lebanon since the beginning of the civil war in 1975, including killings, enforced disappearance, displacement, torture, and illegal detention. If followed, it is hoped these measures will help to foster greater public trust in state institutions and curb Lebanon’s ongoing vulnerability to political violence.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 9/16/2014

    “To Walk Freely with a Wide Heart”

    Author: ICTJ

    This report presents the findings of an in-depth survey of more than 400 conflict victims in 10 districts of Nepal, researching their immediate and long-term needs and aspirations. Participants included those who had received benefits through the government’s Interim Relief Program and those who had been ineligible (such as survivors of torture and sexual violence). It concludes that victims continue to have acute needs and that the government should carry out a comprehensive reparations program immediately.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 9/1/2014

    Possibilities and Challenges for Transitional Justice in Mali

    Author: Virginie Ladisch

    This briefing paper examines the potential in Mali for appropriate and effective transitional justice approaches that are reflective of the primary concerns and demands of citizens. Over 30 interviews were conducted with a wide range of actors in Bamako, including representatives of the state, judiciary, religious organizations, civil society, and international organizations. It concludes that positive steps have been taken toward advancing accountability in the country, but victims and civil society remain critical of the lack of integration among different transitional justice mechanisms as well as the government's top-down approach in a context where the local and communal are of primary importance.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 7/18/2014

    Navigating Paths to Justice in Myanmar's Transition

    Author: Patrick Pierce and Caitlin Reiger

    This report asserts that dealing with past abuses in Myanmar is essential to achieving genuine progress on peacebuilding and economic development in the country. Conflict and high levels of political repression have racked Myanmar for more than half a century. Both President Thein Sein and opposition leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi have highlighted rule of law and good governance as priorities for Myanmar alongside the development of a modern market economy and democracy.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 6/16/2014

    The Accountability Gap on Sexual Violence in Kenya: Reforms and Initiatives Since the Post-Election Crisis

    This briefing paper reviews the Kenyan government’s response to sexual and gender-based violence committed against women, men, and children during the 2007/2008 post-election crisis. It draws on interviews with over 40 survivors about their experience and analyzes the laws and transitional justice mechanisms, like the Commission of Inquiry into Post-Election Violence, that have been put in place to address violations of the past and prevent their recurrence. It includes a set of recommendations to the government, the Attorney-General’s Office, and the National Police Service Commission on closing the accountability gap.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 6/16/2014

    Challenging the Conventional: Can Truth Commissions Strengthen Peace Processes?

    This joint report by ICTJ and the Kofi Annan Foundation explores common assumptions about why truth commissions are created in the wake of armed conflict and what factors make them more likely to succeed – or fail. It arises from a high-level symposium hosted by the two organizations in November 2013, which provided an opportunity for policy makers, practitioners, and scholars with significant experience in peacebuilding and transitional justice to discuss and reflect on truth commissions and the challenges of addressing accountability in peace negotiations. The report includes a foreword by Mr. Kofi Annan, a summary of discussions, two analytical papers, five case studies, and a set of conclusions.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 6/1/2014

    Confronting Impunity and Engendering Transitional Justice Processes in Uganda

    This briefing paper summarizes the findings of consultations undertaken by ICTJ with women’s groups in Gulu, Lira, and Soroti on confronting impunity and engendering transitional justice processes in northern Uganda. Its purpose is to help incorporate women’s needs and justice demands into the drafting and implementation of the Ugandan government’s forthcoming transitional justice policy. The paper’s many detailed recommendations provide guidance on how transitional justice measures, such as material and symbolic reparations, can recognize and redress the specific harms suffered by women as a result of the LRA conflict.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 5/19/2014

    Lessons to Be Learned: An Analysis of the Final Report of Kenya’s Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission

    Author: Christopher Gitari Ndungú

    This paper analyzes the contents of the Final Report that the Kenyan Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission (TJRC) presented to President Uhuru Kenyatta on May 21, 2013, after four years of investigations. In particular, it evaluates the report’s information and findings, the logic of the commission’s conclusions and recommendations, and the apparent efforts made by commissioners to examine notorious and contentious past conducts. The paper concludes that, despite the controversies that surrounded the TJRC during its tenure, the contents of the Final Report can be used to consolidate the search for justice for victims of historical injustices in Kenya.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 1/30/2014

    Failing to Deal with the Past: What Cost to Lebanon?

    Author: ICTJ

    This report examines the situation of impunity in Lebanon that has persisted since the 1975-1990 war through the lenses of core elements of transitional justice. It analyzes Lebanon’s past experience of ineffective transitional justice measures -- including limited domestic trials, narrowly mandated commissions of inquiry, and incomplete remedies for victims -- and their impact on Lebanese society. The report derives lessons that could help to initiate a broader accountability process in Lebanon in the interest of long-term peace and security.

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