In Focus

9/19/2011

Taking a Stand: the Evolution of Human Rights, a book by former ICTJ president Juan E. Méndez, provides an eye-opening firsthand account of the fight against violations of human rights and impunity. Taking a Stand offers tangible policy recommendations to be undertaken by the international community to uncover the atrocities of the past and prevent further abuse.

9/15/2011

In their debate hosted by the Economist, Richard Dicker and Jack Snyder have touched on critical issues that frame the peace and justice debate. In my view, however, the peace and justice debate should focus more concretely on the central issues that will affect the lives of victims and affected societies, rather than solely seeking to resolve geopolitical or national power dynamics.

9/2/2011

In a conversation dedicated to the International Day of the Disappeared, Eduardo Gonzalez, director of ICTJ’s Truth and Memory Program talks to Jose Pablo Baraybar, director of the Peruvian Forensic Anthropology Team. Gonzalez and Baraybar explore why it is crucial for societies in transition to address the issue of the disappeared, the tension between demands of conventional justice and the right to truth, and the need for a strategy in searching for the disappeared.

8/25/2011

As gunfire dies down over Tripoli, the new Libyan authorities will be coming to terms with enormous dilemmas about the hierarchy of priorities in building a new society. Their offices will see long processions of emissaries from near and far in the coming days and weeks. Some will be sternly pressing for issues of security to be immediately addressed and others will demand that business and development concerns precede all else, while there are also bound to be those advocating for justice to be done first and quickly.

8/15/2011

Women played a crucially important role in brokering peace in Solomon Islands but they still face significant barriers to inclusion in transitional justice initiatives. ICTJ has been working closely with women groups to facilitate their formal contribution to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC).

8/8/2011

The appearance of Hosni Mubarak in the opening of his trial this week reassured millions of Egyptians that their revolutionary struggle was not in vain. But the truth about Mubarak’s ability to participate in his trial is still unclear. With the public doubting the court’s seriousness, Mubarak’s appearance could have been a political decision aimed at boosting confidence. If this is the case, the judiciary risks appearing politicized in the eyes of Egyptians.

7/31/2011

ICTJ is pleased to present the KickStarter campaign to launch the Iriba Center for Multimedia Heritage in Kigali, Rwanda. The Iriba Center, whose name means “the source,” is a project to make accessible an audiovisual history of Rwanda, to “keep the country’s history alive.”

7/25/2011

As Kenya continues to address its 2007-08 postelection violence, greater emphasis should be placed on victims’ reparative justice demands, according to a new ICTJ report. The report, “To Live as Other Kenyans Do”: A Study of the Reparative Demands of Kenyan Victims of Human Rights Violations, is a survey of nearly 400 victims’ views and needs as a result of the violence.

7/25/2011

ICTJ hosted a conference on “Strengthening Indigenous Rights through Truth Commissions” July 19-21, 2011. Regional and international experts convened to discuss how truth commissions can incorporate and address indigenous peoples’ rights. Videos of each session and summaries of the conference proceedings are available.

7/19/2011

ICTJ's expert conference on the relationship between truth-seeking and indigenous rights is in session. View the live stream here.

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