Media Coverage

1/20/2017

A Serbian rights group said Wednesday its activists were beaten after interrupting an event organized by the ruling populists that included an appearance by a convicted war criminal.

Youth Initiative for Human Rights said its nine activists were hurt, two of whom sought medical help after the incident late Tuesday in Beska, northern Serbia.

The group said they broke into the event hosting Veselin Sljivancanin, a former Yugoslav army officer sentenced by the U.N. court in the Netherlands for war crimes during Croatia's 1991-95 war.

1/20/2017

On Jan. 16, 1992 guerrilla rebels and the government of El Salvador ended over a decade of internal conflict.

El Salvador marks Monday 25 years since the signing of the peace accords ending 12 years of civil war that left 75,000 people killed and 8,000 disappeared, one of the darkest periods of the Central American nation.

1/17/2017

Prosecutors at the international criminal court at The Hague are due to present their case on Monday against a child soldier turned militia leader from northern Uganda accused of committing war crimes including rape and murder.

Dominic Ongwen, once a feared commander of the Lord’s Resistance Army, appeared last month before the court to plead not guilty, saying that as a child soldier taken by force from his home by the organisation he was a victim of its atrocities, not a perpetrator.

1/17/2017

Jovan Tintor, also known as Joja, went on trial on Monday at the Bosnian state court in Sarajevo on charges of unlawful detention, torture, beating, making people do forced labour and murdering Bosniak and Croat victims at several locations including detention camps.

The indictment charges Tintor, the former president of the Crisis Committee of the Vogosca municipality, on eight counts of having participated in a widespread and systematic attack against the non-Serb population in the municipality from April 1992 to the end of July that year.

1/17/2017

A United Nations human rights envoy is visiting Myanmar amid growing international concern over allegations against the military, including reports of rights abuses in western Rakhine State.

1/17/2017

Colombia’s government announced Sunday it would continue informal negotiations with the country’s last remaining guerrilla group, the ELN, instead of kicking off the first formal round of peace talks on Tuesday as planned. The ELN and the government announced peace talks in June 2014 already, but the parties that have been at war for more than half a decade, have since been unable to proceed to formal peace talks. The formalization of talks was supposed to happen on Tuesday, but have been pushed back after President Juan Manuel Santos demanded the ELN release all hostages.

1/17/2017

Bahrain's prosecution on Thursday extended by two weeks the detention of Shiite opposition leader Nabil Rajab over spreading "false information" about the Sunni-ruled kingdom, his lawyer said. The human rights activist "was interrogated by the prosecution, who decided to extend his pre-trial detention by 15 days over the accusation of spreading rumours and false information," Mohammed al-Jishi said. This accusation is linked to television interviews given by Rajab in 2014 and 2015, the lawyer said, adding a request to free him had been rejected.

1/17/2017

The United Nations warned on Thursday that sabotaging water supplies is a war crime as more than five million people continued to face shortages following an attack on the capital's supplies.

1/17/2017

A human rights abuses complaint against WWF, the world’s largest conservation organisation, is to be examined by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation (OECD) in an unprecedented step. Anti-poaching government “eco-guards” in the Cameroon rainforests, part-funded and logistically supported by WWF, are alleged to have destroyed camps and property belonging to the hunter-gatherer Baka people. The guards are accused of using physical force and threats of violence against the Baka people over a number of years.

1/14/2017

Jovan Tintor, also known as Joja, went on trial on Monday at the Bosnian state court in Sarajevo on charges of unlawful detention, torture, beating, making people do forced labour and murdering Bosniak and Croat victims at several locations including detention camps.

The indictment charges Tintor, the former president of the Crisis Committee of the Vogosca municipality, on eight counts of having participated in a widespread and systematic attack against the non-Serb population in the municipality from April 1992 to the end of July that year.

Pages