Media Coverage

12/6/2018

Amid confusion over another extension of their term, two transitional justice bodies in Nepal have decided to wrap up by presenting a progress report and recorded complaints to the government if the administration denies them more time for looking into the insurgency-era cases of atrocities. Though the term of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) and the Commission of Investigation on Enforced Disappeared Persons (CIEDP) expires on February 9, the government is still undecided whether to extend their terms or to restructure them.

12/6/2018

Uruguay has rejected a request for asylum by Peru’s former president, Alan García, who served two terms from 1985 to 1990 and from 2006 to 2011. Mr. García entered the residence of the Uruguayan ambassador in Lima on November 17 after he was accused of taking bribes from Brazilian construction giant Odebrecht, an accusation he denies. He has been staying there while Uruguay weighed his request. Uruguay said there were no grounds for asylum, as “the three branches of the state function freely” in Peru.

12/6/2018

South Africa’s parliament has approved a report endorsing a constitutional amendment that would allow expropriation of land without compensation, a decision the main opposition party, the Democratic Alliance, said it could challenge in court. Land is a hot-button issue in South Africa where racial inequality remains entrenched more than two decades after the end of apartheid, during which millions among the black majority were dispossessed of their land by a white minority.

12/6/2018

Evidence of war crimes committed by the Syrian government is the strongest collected since the Nazis were tried in Nuremberg, according to the chairman of Commission for International Justice and Accountability Stephen Rapp. In an interview with The World Today, the war crimes prosecutor and former U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues said that his organization has accessed more than 750,000 pages of documents that record the atrocities committed by the regime of President Bashar Al-Assad.

12/5/2018

"If it weren't for Alex Boraine, the institute for a democratic alternative would not have existed in South Africa."

This is according to Paul Graham, former executive director of the Institute for Democracy in South Africa (Idasa), an organisation Boraine founded in 1986 with Frederik van Zyl Slabbert, in "a formidable partnership", Graham said. 

Boraine died in the early hours of Wednesday at the age of 87. 

12/4/2018

UN Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women, Dubravka Simonovic, made remarks on the situation of violence against women at a press conference in Kathmandu, following the conclusion of her 10-day visit to the Himalayan nation. “During my visit, I found that the Nepalese society is beginning to openly acknowledge the levels of violence against women in the country,” she said.

12/4/2018

When a fire breaks out in the Bosnian city of Mostar, Sabit Golos, a veteran firefighter, knows that he does not have to worry unless the flames take hold on the Muslim side of what was, from 1992 until 1994, the front line in a vicious ethnic conflict. That is because Mostar, though long at peace, has two separate fire brigades, one made up mostly of Muslims like Mr. Golos, who are responsible for putting out fires on the east side of the old front line and a second one staffed by Catholic Croats who douse flames on the other side.

12/4/2018

After coming face to face with "unpredictable" gun-waving children almost 25 years ago, the former commander of the failed UN peacekeeping mission during the Rwandan genocide dedicated his life to eliminating the use of children as weapons of war. In an interview with The Associated Press in civil war-torn South Sudan, Romeo Dallaire, who is widely known for warning the UN about Rwanda’s massacre in 1994, said the current approach to combating child soldier recruitment is not “sufficient.” Local security forces must be part of the solution, he said.

12/4/2018

Women who were subjected to torture in Tunisian prisons and interrogation centers recently appeared in the country’s “transitional justice” trials as part of a truth and dignity commission to recount their experience of being tortured under the regimes of Habib Bourguiba (1956-1987) and Zine El Abidine Ben Ali (1987-2011). Since May, amid fears that their cases would be obscured, trials investigating human rights violations under Bourguiba and Ben Ali’s regimes are underway.

12/4/2018

In what is being represented as a major victory in the fight to make Europe pay reparations to the Caribbean for the brutal transatlantic slave trade, the umbrella University of the West Indies (UWI) is reporting that the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom has agreed to begin making reparations payments in the near future, after talks with a regional commission. Dr. Hilary Beckles, the UWI vice chancellor, reported that an agreement had been reached with the UK school to pay £200 million for its part in the English slave trade to the Caribbean.

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