Media Coverage

10/5/2018

A crackdown on a Maoist splinter group by the Nepalese government has raised fears of violence, over a decade after the end of the communist insurgency. Up to 100 members of the Communist Party of Nepal (CPN), including top leaders, have been accused of fomenting pre-election violence and jailed. Talks between the governing Nepal Communist Party and the CPN have yet to yield any concrete results. Meanwhile, spokespeople for the Maoist splinter party has vowed to revive the wartime “people’s government” and “people’s court.”

10/5/2018

The mayor of an Italian town has been put under house arrest following allegations he orchestrated fraudulent marriages to prevent refugees from being deported. Domenico Lucano, the mayor of Riace, gained international fame when he welcomed hundreds of refugees to settle in his small town during the “migration crisis” in the summer of 2015. The arrest follows months of tougher migration enforcement from Italy’s populist government.

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9/28/2018

President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines said on Thursday in Manila, for the first time, that extrajudicial killings had happened under his government’s brutal war on drugs, an admission that could bolster two cases filed against him at the International Criminal Court.

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9/28/2018

The prosecutor for the International Criminal Court, Fatou Bensouda, has opened a preliminary probe into Myanmar’s military crackdown on Rohingya Muslims that led to the deaths of tens of thousands of people and to some 700,000 more to flee into neighboring Bangladesh. Almost three weeks ago, judges at the ICC ruled that the body had jurisdiction over the crimes against the Rohingya despite Myanmar not having signed the Rome Statue because Bangladesh, where most of the refugees are, has.

9/28/2018

The Ugandan state has lined up 120 witnesses to testify against former Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) commander Thomas Kwoyelo. Kwoyelo was arrested in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2009 and brought back to Uganda where he was subsequently charged with 93 counts of rape, kidnap, murder, enslavement, and torture that are alleged to have been committed between 1993 and 2005. The long-delayed trial is now estimated to last two years.

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9/28/2018

A recent pop-up museum in New York City illustrates the harmful effects that so-called broken windows policing has had on the African American and Latino communities in the city. The exhibit features paintings, installations, and photography drawing attention to the epidemic of police shootings of African-American youth and to racial disparities in policing and the criminal justice system.

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9/28/2018

Officials at the International Criminal Court (ICC) announced this week that they can still prosecute Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte even if the country withdraws from the international court because the proceedings were commenced before the withdrawal. The ICC has received two petitions accusing Duterte of murder and crimes against humanity. Duterte unilaterally withdrew from the ICC in March, but opposition lawmakers say the withdrawal was illegal because it was done without senate approval.

9/28/2018

Fifty thousand Syrians have returned from Lebanon so far in 2018. According to the UN High Commission for Refugees, Lebanon is hosting 976,000 registered Syrian refugees, but the government says the total number of Syrians in the country is closer to 1.5 million, which amounts to nearly a quarter of the Lebanese population. Politicians in Beirut have been calling for Syrian refugees to return home as President Bashar al-Assad wins back more of the country.

9/25/2018

Nepalese journalists are demanding changes to new criminal and civil codes they say undermine freedom of speech and expression. The new codes are the result of three years of debates among Nepalese lawmakers about how the 2015 constitution should be interpreted. The new codes criminalize criticizing the president or members of parliament, prohibit publishing private information, ban recording without permission, and require photographers to obtain permits to take, sell and publish photos.

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9/25/2018

At least 58 people were killed during an upsurge of ethnically-motivated violence last weekend on the outskirts of the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa. The initial conflict was sparked by a misunderstanding by groups of youths, but soon took on an ethnic hue. Since Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed took office earlier this year he has been hailed for freeing jailed dissidents, overturning a ban on rebel groups, and pursuing a landmark peace deal with long-time adversary Eritrea.

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