Media Coverage

7/21/2020

The coronavirus pandemic is being used to reduce civil liberties, feminist groups in Chile and Russia, who say women’s rights are especially at risk, have warned.

The Chilean collective Las Tesis is being sued for allegedly instigating violence against the same police force that they accuse of abuses.

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7/21/2020

A Malaysian court will hear a bid to set aside caning sentences handed down to 27 Rohingya refugees from Myanmar, lawyers said, a punishment that rights groups have decried as vicious and tantamount to torture.

In June, a court on Malaysia’s Langkawi island sentenced 40 Rohingya refugees to seven months in jail for arriving in the country by boat without a valid permit, Collin Andrew, a lawyer representing the refugees, told Reuters on Tuesday.

7/21/2020

The leaders of Germany, France, and Italy are calling for nations to “end their increasing interference” in Libya and respect a much-violated arms embargo, saying Saturday that they are ready to consider sanctions if breaches of the embargo continue.

7/21/2020

Several hundred mourners gathered in the Bosnian village of Kamicani on Monday to bury six Bosniak Muslims killed 28 years ago in one of the most gruesome episodes of the 1992-1995 war, with those present observing strict coronavirus precautions.

The victims, mainly prisoners from the wartime detention camps for non-Serbs near the town of Prijedor, were told they were being released in a prison exchange but instead were driven to the Koricani Cliffs in central Bosnia, lined up on the edge of the ravine, and shot by Bosnian Serb forces in August 1992.

7/21/2020

Sudan’s ousted long-serving leader Omar al-Bashir has gone on trial in the capital, Khartoum, in connection with the military coup that brought him to power more than three decades ago.

The 76-year-old, who has already been convicted for corruption, could face the death penalty if found guilty over his role in the 1989 coup.

More than 20 former officials are on trial alongside him.

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7/16/2020

A statue of an anti-racism protester in Britain which had replaced one of a slave trader was removed Thursday, local authorities said, in an ongoing battle over the symbolic empty plinth.

The authorities in the southwestern city of Bristol said they had taken down the sculpture — entitled “A Surge of Power” showing Black Lives Matter demonstrator Jen Reid with her fist raised — almost exactly 24 hours after it was placed on the plinth without permission.

7/16/2020

In late January, around 3,100 people — 1,179 families — fled their homes as clashes broke out between armed groups vying for control of drug-trafficking routes and coca crops. Many more were unable to leave, “confined,” as local residents described it, to their villages by the armed groups.

This reflects what continues to happen four years after the signing of Colombia’s historic peace agreement, and as the country now hosts 1.8 million Venezuelans, many forced from their homeland by hunger and struggling to get by due to the COVID-19 fallout.

7/16/2020

Tunisian Prime Minister Elyes Fakhfakh has resigned from his post, the government said in a statement, after a dispute with the Ennahdha party that had withdrawn its support for the government.

Tunisia has been praised as a rare success story for democratic transition after the Arab Spring regional uprisings sparked by its 2011 revolution.

But its leaders have struggled to meet the expectations of the Tunisian people, and the already fragile economy has been battered by the closure of the country’s borders due to the novel coronavirus pandemic.

7/16/2020

The UN-recognized Government of National Accord in Libya and forces loyal to renegade military commander Khalifa Haftar have exchanged eight prisoners each in Misrata, with the hope of more to follow.

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7/16/2020

Taliban insurgents launched a complex attack on an intelligence compound in northern Afghanistan on Monday that began with a suicide bombing and killed at least 11 intelligence agency personnel, officials said.

Abdul Khalil Musadiq, a provincial hospital chief, said many of those wounded were civilians, including children.

The Taliban claimed the attack. The insurgents have continued to regularly target Afghan security forces despite signing a peace agreement with the U.S. in February that was intended to pave the way for an end to decades of war.

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