Media Coverage

7/7/2020

 The Transitional Justice Commission promised Thursday to continue to investigate the death of democracy activist Chen Wen-chen, whose case remains unsolved after 39 years.

Chen, who was an associate professor at Carnegie Mellon University in the United States, was found dead on the campus of National Taiwan University on July 3, 1981, during a vacation to Taiwan to visit his family.

He had been interrogated a day earlier by the Taiwan Garrison Command, a since-disbanded state security force known for suppressing democracy activists during Taiwan's Martial Law era.

7/7/2020

Kenyan and American protesters knelt outside the United States Embassy in Nairobi one morning last month, outraged at George Floyd’s killing and the racism and brutality they saw across the Atlantic. But they were also furious about police abuses at home, in Kenya.

Protests sprang up all over town. In the large slum of Kibera, in front of a large mural of Mr. Floyd, residents chanted, “Stop killing us.” In front of Parliament, youths carried caskets to protest extrajudicial killings.

7/7/2020

Srebrenica genocide survivor Ramiz Nukic has made himself a promise — he will search for the remains of victims of the mass killing 25 years ago until the last of them is found.

Walking through the woods around his home in the hamlet of Kamenice near the village of Kravice, Nukic has found remains and personal belongings that have helped identify about 300 out of 1,000 men killed by Bosnian Serb troops there in July 1995.

7/7/2020

Syrian and Russian planes have carried out deadly aerial strikes on schools, hospitals, and markets in Idlib province that amount to war crimes, UN investigators said on Tuesday in a report that also condemned attacks by Islamist militants.

They said that “indiscriminate bombardment” by pro-government forces, ahead of a March ceasefire brokered with Turkey, claimed hundreds of lives and forced one million civilians to flee, which may amount to a crime against humanity.

7/7/2020

Arbitrary detentions, torture of inmates, and deaths of detainees have soared during the last few years of Yemen’s civil war, according to a new report that found all parties of the conflict responsible for human rights abuses that could amount to war crimes.

7/2/2020

The UN Security Council on Wednesday finally backed UN chief Antonio Guterres’ March 23 call for a global truce amid the coronavirus pandemic, adopting a resolution after months of talks to win a compromise between the United States and China.

The resolution, drafted by France and Tunisia, calls for “all parties to armed conflicts to engage immediately in a durable humanitarian pause for at least 90 consecutive days” to allow for the delivery of humanitarian aid.

7/2/2020

Three Myanmar military officers have been found guilty by a court-martial investigating atrocities against the Rohingya in conflict-ridden Rakhine state, the army announced.

The rare action against members of the military on Tuesday comes as Myanmar faces charges of genocide at the UN’s top court over a brutal 2017 crackdown against the Rohingya.

Read more here.

7/2/2020

Western and Arab countries have pledged $1.5 billion at a conference hosted by Germany to help Sudan ease an economic crisis hampering its transition towards democracy after the fall of leader Omar al-Bashir.

Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok—running Sudan under a precarious, transitional power-sharing deal with the military since al-Bashir’s overthrow in a popular uprising last year—is desperate for more foreign support.

7/2/2020

Kenyan police have killed three people when a crowd of motorcycle taxi drivers protested against the arrest of a colleague for ignoring coronavirus restrictions. Police shot at the crowd in the western city of Lessos after clashes, a police statement said.

The police have ordered the arrest of the officers involved.

Kenyan police face increasing scrutiny over accusations they are excessively enforcing the coronavirus restrictions.

Read more here.

7/2/2020

Hit by its worst economic crisis in modern history, the Lebanese pound has lost over 80 percent of its value since October, when nationwide anti-corruption protests began to rock the country. Despite a decades-long peg of 1,500 to the dollar, people now widely use the black market value of the pound as a reference of the currency’s real worth.

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