Media Coverage

11/15/2018

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa said his country has survived a “dark period,” when corruption was rampant, and is now focused on achieving economic growth and land reform to win popular support in general elections next year. “We are moving from a very dark period of our recent history,” said Ramaphosa to international journalists, describing that his ruling party, the African National Congress, is working to root out graft. “We are in a new period now, we are no longer in a period of just sliding downward ...

11/15/2018

Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya who fled Myanmar, citing rape, murder, and arson, will not be forcibly repatriated, Bangladesh’s Rohingya Relief and Repatriation Commissioner, Mohammad Abul Kalam, has said. “No one will be forced back to Myanmar,” Abul Kalam told Al Jazeera. Bangladesh is scheduled to send back an initial group of 2,260 Rohingya from 485 families, in line with a bilateral plan agreed by the two governments in October.

11/15/2018

Over 200 mass graves holding as many as 12,000 bodies have been found in areas of Iraq once controlled by the Islamic State (IS), the United Nations (UN) said on Tuesday. The findings were highlighted in a joint report released by the UN mission to Iraq and the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, which called the sites a “legacy of terror.” The UN has estimated that 30,000 civilians were killed by the IS from 2014 to 2017 — “a number that should be considered an absolute minimum.” But many of those victims were found and buried by their families.

11/12/2018

Pope Francis has decreed that an American religious brother, James Miller, was killed out of hatred for the Catholic faith during Guatemala’s civil war and can be beatified. Miller is the second American slain in Guatemala to move a step closer to possible sainthood in recent years. The Vatican said Thursday that Francis approved a decree recognizing that Miller, from Stevens Point, Wisconsin, died as a martyr on February 13, 1982, in Huehuetenango, Guatemala.

11/12/2018

Speaking at the first day of the national summit against gender-based violence and femicide in Centurion, South Africa, South African President Cyril Ramaphosa called on the country’s judiciary to come to the aid of women. The government convened the two-day gathering together with civil society organizations in an effort to find ways to stop the scourge of abuse. Most speakers at the gender summit shared a similar belief that South Africa’s legal framework, especially when it comes to women victims of gender-based violence, needs to be reviewed urgently.

11/12/2018

For almost three years, while her home city of Mosul was under occupation by so-called Islamic State (IS), Tahani Salih kept a daily diary documenting their crimes. Although the diary is gone, Tahani remembers every word of the plans she made. Now that IS has been defeated, Tahani is throwing herself into putting those plans in place.

11/12/2018

Following the recent ruling of the South Korean Supreme Court on reparations for the victims of forced labor under Imperialist Japan during World War II, the Japanese government is reportedly planning to issue directives to Japanese firms not to accept the demand for reparations or reconciliation. The Japanese government is planning to hold a briefing session for the Japanese firms, with the intention of providing them with such instructions, the Japanese daily Mainichi Shimbun reported.

11/12/2018

The decision by the Zagreb County Court in Croatia to reduce the sentence of convicted war criminal Marko Radic has caused a political storm in Sarajevo. The judgment, which cut Radic’s sentence from 21 years to 12 and a half years in prison, was handed down by the court on October 1. It amended a verdict originally delivered by a Bosnian state court in Sarajevo, which convicted Radic of crimes against humanity in March 2011.

11/8/2018

Tunisian filmmakers are making the most of newfound freedoms to tackle issues banished for decades from the silver screen, prompting a post-revolution cinema revival. "Since 2011, one of the most tangible benefits we've seen is the ability to talk about all topics, especially themes of society, our daily life, its complexity and its richness," said producer Habib Attia. "In cinema it pays to have that sincerity." Just two or three films a year were released during the 2000s, but the industry has rebounded since the 2011 uprising that toppled dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.

11/8/2018

The indictment of a senior Guatemalan government official concerning his alleged participation in police death squads has reopened deep questions about President Jimmy Morales’ security cabinet. On October 29, the Attorney General’s Office of Guatemala accused Kamilo Rivera, the deputy minister of the interior and the president’s main connection to the National Civil Police (PNC), of forming death squads within the Guatemalan state over a decade ago. Rivera has now gone missing.

Pages