Media Coverage

12/13/2018

Like many urban Colombians, Nicolás Sánchez—a young journalist from the country’s capital, Bogotá—never saw the country’s civil war firsthand. Instead, he grew up watching it from afar, in television reports of massacres and gun battles deep in the countryside. Reporters would often only show the point of view of the military, while rural Colombians, who bore the brunt of conflict, were often ignored. Coverage instead focused on urban incidents, such as kidnappings of public figures and attacks against government buildings. Media would also turn a blind eye to military atrocities.

12/13/2018

The basic policy on a bill to compensate people forcibly sterilized under Japan's now-defunct eugenic protection law (1948-1996) was approved on December 10 by a ruling party working team and a non-partisan group of lawmakers. The plan would see the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare examine claimants’ petitions and pay reparations to people it determines were victims of the eugenic law, which targeted people deemed to have disabilities, mental illnesses, or hereditary diseases. The lump-sum payment amounts, however, have yet to be specified.

12/13/2018

Around 140 journalists and media workers were killed during and after the violent break-up of Yugoslavia in the 1990s, but only one person has ever been convicted of responsibility for any of their deaths—Serb paramilitary boss Dragan Vasiljkovic, alias ‘Captain Dragan’, who was found guilty of an attack in Croatia in which a German journalist died. Amid the hysteria of nationalist unrest, journalists were seen by some as enemies who reported inconvenient truths.

12/13/2018

After four years working “under fire” and interviewing almost 50,000 witnesses, Tunisia's commission is tasked with serving justice to victims of half a century of dictatorship is poised to submit its recommendations. Set up in 2014 following the 2011 revolution and in the wake of dictator Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali's fall, the Truth and Dignity Commissionhas sought to “reveal the truth about the human rights violations” in Tunisia from 1955 to 2013.

12/13/2018

Joseph Kabila, the outgoing president of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), has said he plans to stay in politics and does not rule out running again for the top job in 2023. Kabila, who will be stepping down after long-delayed elections are held on December 23, told Reuters news agency on Sunday that he wanted to protect his “many accomplishments” by remaining in politics. “There is still a long journey ahead and there are still other chapters that will be written before we can write the history books,” he said.

12/11/2018

South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir and his deputy Wani Igga have joined a campaign seeking to reunite and reconcile South Sudanese people torn apart by a five-year conflict. Using pre-recorded audio messages aired on local radio stations, the leaders of the world’s youngest nation are urging the people of South Sudan to embrace forgiveness to pave way for nationwide reconciliation.

12/11/2018

“I thought the ISIS ‘caliphate’ would be perfect, like a utopia,” says Um Mohammed, who describes having felt discriminated against as a Muslim in the Netherlands and says the militant group's online propaganda drew her in. “I don't think [life in the caliphate] was what most people expected. I regret going and having, you know, to go through this.” Now, she is one of thousands of foreign women and children who languish in detention camps in northeastern Syria, unwanted by their home governments and with no clear future.

12/11/2018

Two years after the signing of the peace accord in Colombia, the reinsertion into society of former FARC guerrillas is difficult and complicated, though the female former rebels are organizing to forge ahead with what they call gendered projects. Such is the case of Yorladys Jimenez and Elsy Palacios, who belonged to the FARC when it was an insurgency and are now members of the political party that succeeded it, which likewise goes by the acronym FARC.

12/11/2018

Northern Ireland is falling behind on human rights in a broad range of areas, according to a new report from the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission (NIHRC). Multiple human rights issues need immediate action to be taken by the UK government or relevant public authorities, NIHRC chief commissioner Les Allamby has said.

12/11/2018

Fears are rising that Nepal has become a target for pedophiles acting under the cover of aid work or philanthropy. Police in the poverty-stricken nation have arrested five foreigners in the last year for the alleged sexual abuse of children. An investigation by Al Jazeera found many of those arrested had been working for aid organizations or financially supporting poor children and their families. “Many foreigners come here to Nepal. They love Nepal and we really respect them for their dedication and support,” Kabit Katawal, deputy superintendent of the Nepal police, told Al Jazeera.

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