Book

4/26/2011

Developing societies emerging from conflict and authoritarianism are frequently beset by poverty, inequality, weak institutions, broken infrastructure, poor governance, insecurity, and low levels of social capital. The same countries are also often the scene of massive human rights violations which leave in their wake victims who are displaced, marginalized, handicapped, widowed, and orphaned — people who have strong claims to justice.

Date published: 
Mon, 06/01/2009 - 17:18

4/26/2011

Given that women represent a very large proportion of the victims of conflicts and authoritarianism, it makes sense to examine whether reparation programs can be designed to redress women more fairly and efficiently and seek to subvert gender hierarchies that often antecede the conflict.

Date published: 
Thu, 10/01/2009 - 17:17

4/26/2011

Women face a double marginalization under authoritarian regimes and during and after violent conflicts. Nonetheless, reparations programs are rarely designed to address the needs of women victims. What Happened to the Women? Gender and Reparations for Human Rights Violations, argues for the introduction of a gender dimension into reparations programs. The volume explores gender and reparations policies in Guatemala, Peru, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, and Timor-Leste.

Date published: 
Thu, 01/12/2006 - 17:14

4/26/2011

Over the past twenty years, international donors have invested in large-scale disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) programs. In the same period, there has been a proliferation of transitional justice measures to help render truth, justice, and reparations in the aftermath of state violence and civil war. Yet DDR programs are seldom analyzed to consider justice-related aims; and transitional justice mechanisms rarely articulate strategies for coordinating with DDR.

Date published: 
Fri, 01/01/2010 - 14:49

4/26/2011

Most comprehensive book-length study of reparation programmes currently available, including case-studies, thematic chapters, and national legislation documents. Contains contributions from an international and cross-disciplinary group of leading scholars and practitioners. Provides answers to questions which frequently arise in the design and implementation of large-scale reparation programmes world-wide.

Purchase the book from Oxford University Press

Date published: 
Tue, 01/01/2008 - 14:42

4/26/2011

Vetting—the process by which abusive or corrupt employees are excluded from public office—is often practiced in post-conflict societies, yet remains one of the least studied aspects of transitional justice. In a co-publication of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) and the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ), editors Alexander Mayer-Rieckh and Pablo de Greiff have assembled a collection of essays systematically exploring vetting practices in a variety of countries and contexts.

Date published: 
Mon, 01/01/2007 - 14:20

8/31/2010

Esta publicación examina losefectos, riesgos y el potencial de ampliar la aplicación del campo de la justicia transicional a casos en los que no está definido un momento clave de transición política hacia la paz o la democracia y que, por el contrario, se caracterizan por la continuidad política y la permanencia del conflicto.

Date published: 
Tue, 08/31/2010 - 11:43

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