Research Paper / Report

2/1/2018

As human rights advocates and state representatives increasingly acknowledge the necessity of involving children in truth-seeking processes, there is a growing need for practical tools that facilitate children’s participation while prioritizing their protection. This statement-taking protocol provides a framework for interviewing children who have expressed a desire to recount their experiences to truth-seeking and documentation efforts, outlining protection principles, inquiry strategies, and behavioral guidelines for interacting with children. This protocol is intended to help advance effective responses to human rights violations committed against children in the context of armed conflict and oppressive rule; however, the techniques and guidelines contained herein are not themselves new. This tool has been developed based on decades of research and reflection from social workers, mental-health professionals, and child-protection advocates working to address child maltreatment at the individual, family, and community levels.

Date published: 
Thu, 02/01/2018 - 10:30

7/23/2012

In collaboration with the Brookings-LSE Project on Internal Displacement, ICTJ’s Research Unit examined how transitional justice can be used to address the range of injustices associated with displacement and thereby serve as part of a comprehensive approach to the resolution of displacement.Based on the project’s findings, this report provides an overview of the relationship between transitional justice and displacement and offers specific guidance to policymakers and practitioners in the numerous fields that share a concern with displacement, including transitional justice, humanitarianism, peacebuilding, and development.

Date published: 
Mon, 07/23/2012 - 12:59

4/28/2011

Enforced disappearances were seen in small numbers in Nepal as early as 1985. However, it was the start of the ten year long Maoist insurgency in 1996 aimed at the abolition of the Constitutional Monarchy and the establishment of a People’s Republic that ushered in state repression and counter-insurgency strategies and saw a decade of sustained enforced disappearances unfold.

Date published: 
Tue, 01/01/2008 - 15:18

4/28/2011

Indonesia and Timor-Leste created the Commission for Truth and Friendship bilaterally in 2005. The commission has not yet delivered substantive transitional-justice benefits, and its public hearings have seriously compromised the goals of truth and resconciliation.

Date published: 
Tue, 01/01/2008 - 15:11

4/28/2011

During a period of ethnic strife in Burundi, several hundred thousand people lost their lives or were displaced. Now political actors must address the issue of security security reform.

Date published: 
Sat, 11/01/2008 - 15:06

4/25/2011

The Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL or Special Court) was established in 2002 when the two United Nations (UN) ad hoc international tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda had already existed for several years and when the first lessons could be drawn from their experiences. Many observers praised the Special Court model as an innovation because it contained several important features that distinguish it from the purely international tribunals.

Date published: 
Thu, 01/01/2009 - 14:59

4/25/2011

This report provides guidance to policymakers and practitioners on the ways in which transitional justice initiatives may function better in divided societies. If transitional justice can find ways to act as a means of political learning across communities, foster trust and recognition, and if it can serve to breakdown harmful myths and stereotypes, then this will be at least a small step toward meeting the challenges such contexts present.

Date published: 
Sun, 11/01/2009 - 13:27

4/21/2011

Bosnians have a range of expectations of the ICTY—or as it is known in the region, “the Hague Tribunal” or simply “The Hague”—comparing their hopes to the goals enunciated by the Security Council when it created the Tribunal and by the ICTY itself.

Date published: 
Fri, 01/01/2010 - 14:01

4/20/2011

The term "civil society" is used by both the transitional justice and the development communities, often in a positive light: transitional justice measures are often said to contribute to strengthening civil society, and at the same time, to some extent, to depend on it; similarly, development is also said to contribute to and be facilitated by a vigorous civil society. This paper critically examines these connections to civil society in order to articulate a way of thinking about the relationship between transitional justice and development.

Date published: 
Sun, 11/01/2009 - 15:13

4/20/2011

This paper examines the links between education and transitional justice initiatives in contexts affected by conflict. It argues that conceptually there can be meaningful mutual reinforcement between the educational goal of participation and the transitional justice goals of recognition and trust. Moreover, practical overlap between education and transitional justice initiatives offers opportunities for more direct synergies. 

Date published: 
Sun, 11/01/2009 - 15:06

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