• Date published: 1/1/2007

    Against the Current: War Crimes Prosecutions in Serbia

    Author: ICTJ; Bogdan Ivanišević

    This report examines the effectiveness of war crimes prosecutions in Serbia. While the War Crimes Chamber (WCC) and the Office of the War Crimes Prosecutor (OWCP) have had some success, significant concerns exist - such as opposition from ethnic nationalists. Despite shortcomings, the WCC and OWCP can potentially help provide justice, especially if given more active domestic and international political support.

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  • Date published: 1/1/2007

    Was the Dujail Trial Fair?

    Author: ICTJ; Miranda Sissons and Ari S. Bassin

    This paper evaluates the Dujail trial, the first of fourteen trials in Iraq against persons accused of crimes against humanity. Although the trial was potentially a new attempt at Iraqi justice, it fell short in many ways. Ultimately, it was rendered ineffective due to political interference, lack of judicial independence, and absence of cultural respect and impartiality in the judicial process.

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  • Date published: 1/1/2007

    Early Reflections on Local Perceptions, Legitimacy and Legacy of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon

    Author: ICTJ; Marieke Wierda, Habib Nassar, and Lynn Maalouf

    This journal article examines challenges to the legitimacy of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL). These challenges include selective impunity, the highly selective nature of the jurisdiction of the STL, and the fears that the STL itself will act as an instrument for foreign powers. These challanges may be addressed by the UN and STL through their operations - by transparently selecting judges and senior officials, attracting funding from a variety of states, and conducting effective outreach.

  • Date published: 1/1/2007

    Justice as Prevention: Vetting Public Employees in Transitional Societies

    Author: ed. Pablo de Greiff and Alexander Mayer-Rieckh

    Vetting—the process by which abusive or corrupt employees are excluded from public office—is often practiced in post-conflict societies, yet remains one of the least studied aspects of transitional justice. In a co-publication of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) and the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ), editors Alexander Mayer-Rieckh and Pablo de Greiff have assembled a collection of essays systematically exploring vetting practices in a variety of countries and contexts.

  • Date published: 1/1/2007

    Negotiating peace in Liberia: Preserving the possibility for Justice

    Author: ICTJ, Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue; Priscilla Hayner

    This report focuses Liberia's Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) of 2003. It examines many key decisions that were made in creating the CPA, and centers on questions of justice, accountability and the rule of law. It notes developments in the four years after the CPA was signed, and provides insights to assist in future mediation efforts.

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  • Date published: 1/1/2007

    An Administrative Practices Manual for Internationally Assisted Criminal Justice Institutions

    Author: ICTJ; Robin Vincent

    This reference manual offers a template for developing and operating an internationally-assisted criminal justice institution. It provides a practical basis for setting up such an institution from an administrative perspective, drawing on numerous relevant practices currently used in existing institutions. It aims to highlight the importance of flexibility and innovation, and comments on other areas of responsibility that overlap with administrative functions.

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  • Date published: 12/22/2006

    ICTJ Report: Colombians Want Genuine Peace with Justice

    Author: ICTJ

    This article focuses on the results of an ICTJ nation-wide survey: Colombian Perceptions and Opinions on Justice, Truth, Reparations, and Reconciliation. Colombians expressed a strong demand for accountability and reparations and low support for lenient sentences. ICTJ demands the Colombian government to listen to its people and take steps to deliver justice to victims and negotiate a durable peace.

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  • Date published: 12/1/2006

    Croatia: Selected Developments in Transitional Justice

    Author: ICTJ; Thierry Cruvellier and Marta Valiñas

    This case study offers an overview of some of the major issues and recent developments in transitional justice in Croatia. While the main focus is on war crimes prosecutions before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and Croatian courts, it also examines truth-telling efforts (or the lack thereof), reparations, and the relevant institutional reforms by the Croatian State.

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  • Date published: 11/1/2006

    Comments on Draft Internal Rules for the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

    Author: ICTJ

    ICTJ provides constructive comments on the draft Internal Rules for the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC). While the draft Internal Rules provide greater procedural clarity for the ECCC proceedings, ICTJ lists several concerns in five areas that must be focused on. These include: trials in absentia, protection and support for victims and witnesses, the ECCC's power to award reparations, public accessibility of the proceedings, and some key lessons from the ICTJ's monitoring of the Iraqi High Tribunal.

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  • Date published: 11/1/2006

    Dujail: Trial and Error?

    Author: ICTJ

    This paper summarizes the basic facts about the Dujail trial, the first trial before the Iraqi High Tribunal (IHT) against Saddam Hussein and seven others. It also summarizes facts about the IHT in general. It considers both what the Iraqis wanted out of the trial, what such prosecutions can achieve, and evaluates the trial itself.

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