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What hope is there for justice for victims of atrocities in profoundly fractured societies, where systems of government have broken down and social and political divisions run deep?

Where should justice for some of the world’s worst crimes be done? In national courts or at the International Criminal Court in The Hague?

Since the beginning of the 1980s, Latin American countries have undergone various processes of political transformation.

This book presents a series of essays on truth and criminal justice in Peru. It aims to contribute to analysis on how to strengthen and consolidate democracy there.

In September 1985, ninemembers of Argentina’smilitary junta, whose successive regimes covered the period in Argentine history known as the “dirty war,” walked into a courtroom in downtown Buenos Ai

This is a compilation of cases from the Criminal Chamber of the Supreme Court of Colombia.

A three-judge panel of Peru’s Supreme Court will announce a verdict before the end of this year in the trial of Alberto Fujimori, Peru’s president from 1990-2000, on charges of murder and kidnappin

In Colombia, the shifting boundaries between drug trafficking and political crime and the tension between security and human rights pose particular challenges for those seeking accountability for p

Indigenous populations throughout the world are widely recognized as groups affected by political and economic marginalization.

As the first national truth commission to be created in an established democracy, Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) is a bold experiment.