National Prosecutions

8/14/2018

As Syrian President Bashar Assad tightens his grip in Syria, activists who lost the challenge to Assad on the streets of Syria are waging a new fight in European courts. In June, Germany’s Federal Supreme Court issued charges and an international arrest warrant for one of Syria’s most senior military officials. A network of over 30 exiled Syrian lawyers across Europe has been helping to collect evidence and documentation of crimes against humanity for use in an envisioned future prosecution.

8/14/2018

This week marks five years since at least 1,000 people were killed by security forces in Rabaa Square in Cairo, while protesting against the coup that deposed democratically elected President Mohamed Morsi. Perpetrators have not been held accountable and there have been no new investigations or memorialization to mark the tragic anniversary.

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8/14/2018

As Ethiopia continues its breathtaking reforms, questions have arisen about how the government will deal with the injustices committed by security forces behind prison walls. While Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has denounced the abuses prisoners suffered as “state-sponsored terrorism,” he has thus far not announced plans to investigate the abuses or set up a process for victims to seek redress. Many former prisoners suffer medical and psychological complications stemming from torture they endured during their detention.

8/13/2018

General Abdul Rashid Dostum, the vice president of Afghanistan, recently returned to the Central Asian country after two years exile in Turkey. He initially fled in 2016 after credible accusations of rape against him were aired on national TV. Despite having a long history of human rights violations, Kabul laid out a red carpet for the general, drawing attention to concerns over impunity.

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8/13/2018

The President of Ivory Coast has pardoned 800 people, many of whom were accused of fomenting violence during post-election violence in 2010-2011. Simone Gbagbo, the former first lady who is accused of organizing street fighters when her husband, Laurent Gbagbo, refused to accept his electoral defeat in 2010, was among those granted amnesty.

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8/8/2018

Indigenous peoples are still some of the most marginalized and vulnerable communities around the world. In a conflict, they are often some of the most affected as their resource-rich territories are coveted by powerful and violent groups, their identity and loyalty perceived with mistrust, and their basic humanity and rights questioned by warring parties. Outside conflict zones, indigenous groups have been forced to battle the slow erosion of their languages, cultures, and traditions while struggling against the effects of centuries of genocide, colonialism, and exclusion.

8/7/2018

The Syrian government has started to update civil registries to reflect deaths among its incarcerated population. Mass arrests and torture were allegedly used by the regime of Bashir al Assad to suppress anti-government protests that swept the country in 2011. For years, families who had a loved ones arrested had no news about their whereabouts or status. As the government updates the registries, activists fear the news of hundreds, if not thousands, of deaths may follow.

8/7/2018

The government of Myanmar recently appointed four supposedly independent commissioners to investigate atrocities committed against Rohingya Muslims by the military last year. However, at least half of the commissioners have a questionable track record on human rights, adding to the suspicion the commission is a fig leaf to placate the international community. Myanmar’s government has persistently said that last year’s military campaign against Muslim civilians in the north of the country was a legitimate military operation targeting insurgents.

8/2/2018

One-time warlord and former Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba has returned to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) for the first time in the 11 years to submit his candidacy for the president. He spent the last decade in The Hague where he was on trial at the International Criminal Court for crimes against humanity and war crimes that his militia committed in the Central African Republic. He was initially found guilty on both counts, but upon appeal the court ruled he was not criminally liable for crimes committed by his troops.

8/1/2018

A confidential report sent to the United Nations (UN) Department of Peacekeeping Operations claims that senior Sri Lankan officers accused of war crimes have been deployed to UN operations in Mali, Lebanon, Darfur, and South Sudan. The report, authored by the South Africa-based International Truth and Justice Project, claims that a number of the senior Sri Lankan commanders were involved in abuses during the final phase of war with Tamil rebels in 2009.

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