National Prosecutions

8/6/2020

Despite mounting criticism, Croatian President Zoran Milanovic has presented an award to a Bosnian Croat war crimes suspect, decorating a wartime Croat police unit for their “contribution to the liberation of Croatia.”

Zlatan Mijo Jelic, a retired general of the Croatian Defense Council, received the award at a ceremony on Tuesday in the Croatian city of Knin marking the 25th anniversary of the country’s victory over rebel Serbs during the war in 1995.

Senior Expert, Programs

8/3/2020

It may seem trivial for me to write about why those who continue to mark July 17 as "International Justice Day" should finally stop calling it that. Many human rights groups (including ICTJ), United Nations agencies, and governments have been publicly using that phrase since 2010. It is for victims of massive and systematic human rights violations, including abuses that amount to international crimes under the Rome Statute, that it is important to end the misconception that the phrase encourages.

7/21/2020

Sudan’s ousted long-serving leader Omar al-Bashir has gone on trial in the capital, Khartoum, in connection with the military coup that brought him to power more than three decades ago.

The 76-year-old, who has already been convicted for corruption, could face the death penalty if found guilty over his role in the 1989 coup.

More than 20 former officials are on trial alongside him.

Read more here.

7/16/2020

Colombia's Special Jurisdiction for Peace (SJP) aims to achieve criminal accountability through a mixed system of restorative and retributive justice. This report describes the court’s mixed model, delves into its innerworkings, and critically assesses its restorative justice components and their impact.

Date published: 
Thu, 07/16/2020 - 14:54

7/10/2020

Tunis, July 10, 2020—The Truth and Dignity Commission’s (TDC) final report was at last published on June 24, six year after the TDC began its work. It marks an important milestone in Tunisia’s transition, but the journey ahead to justice and democracy is a long one. Policymakers and practitioners now have the responsibility to take the next step forward.

7/2/2020

Three Myanmar military officers have been found guilty by a court-martial investigating atrocities against the Rohingya in conflict-ridden Rakhine state, the army announced.

The rare action against members of the military on Tuesday comes as Myanmar faces charges of genocide at the UN’s top court over a brutal 2017 crackdown against the Rohingya.

Read more here.

6/30/2020

U.S. Attorney for the District of Colorado Jason Dunn announced Thursday that a Gambian man who had been living in Denver was indicted on torture charges for his actions in the Gambia in 2006.

Michael Correa was a former member of the Junglers, a Gambian armed unit. The Junglers operated outside the regular Gambia Armed Forces command, receiving orders from and answering to former President Yahya Jammeh.

In 2006, Correa allegedly conspired with others to commit torture against individuals suspected of plotting a coup against then-President Jammeh.

6/30/2020

Kosovo’s president on Monday denied committing war crimes during and after a 1998-1999 armed conflict between ethnic Albanian separatists and Serbia, and said he would resign if an indictment against him is confirmed.

A judge will now take several months to decide whether the cases built by the special prosecutor's office are strong enough to put Thaci, charged with nearly 100 murders, and the others on trial.

6/16/2020

A Sudanese war crimes suspect said on Monday that charges mentioned on his arrest warrant are untrue, during an initial appearance at the International Criminal Court in The Hague.

The suspect, who had previously been identified in court documents as having the surname Kushayb, said his preferred name was Ali Muhammad Ali Abd-Al-Rahman. He is accused of persecution, murder, and rape in the western Sudanese region of Darfur in 2003-2004.

5/19/2020

Sparing almost no corner of the world from its wrath, the COVID-19 pandemic has now spread to every country. In an effort to slow the contagion, governments in most countries have been taking drastic measures requiring all residents other than essential workers to confine themselves in their homes, and shutting down vast sectors of their economies. The impact has been crushing. COVID-19 has profoundly affected every country where ICTJ currently works: Armenia, Colombia, Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Gambia, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and Uganda. We recently caught up with ICTJ’s heads of country programs to learn more about the impact the pandemic is having on transitional justice and society more broadly.

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