In Focus

On August 7, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) found two senior leaders of the Khmer Rouge, Nuon Chea and Khieu Samphan, guilty of crimes against humanity. For many victims who have been waiting for 35 years, the judgment still felt like bittersweet justice.

In his new book, Diplomatic Counterinsurgency: Lessons from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Canadian lawyer Philippe Leroux-Martin analyzes how interventions from foreign powers to end armed conflict can actually create new forms of conflict.

By this summer, dozens of paramilitaries and guerrillas in Colombia's Justice and Peace process will have already spent eight years in prison. In accordance with the law, those who fulfill their obligations to contribute to the truth and provide reparation to victims should be released after serving eight years. In this op-ed, ICTJ's Maria Camila Moreno analyzes the valuable lessons learned through this process.

Cote d’Ivoire must prioritize effective consultations and ensure meaningful engagement with victims and civil society throughout the country in its efforts to provide reparations to victims of political violence that engulfed the country during the disputed 2010 presidential elections.

After more than half a century of repressive military rule, Myanmar has embarked on a fragile, yet hopeful transition to democracy. To accompany the release of ICTJ's new report "Navigating Paths to Justice in Myanmar's Transition," we talk with Deputy Program Director Anna Myriam Roccatello for analysis on the complexities of peace, development and justice in the country.

Continuing political repression, cronyism, and ongoing conflicts are disrupting attempts to put Myanmar on a linear path to democracy, peace, and development, says a new report from the ICTJ. According to the report, titled “Navigating Paths to Justice in Myanmar’s Transition,” dealing with current and historical abuses is essential to achieving genuine progress on peacebuilding and economic development in the country.