Report

This report asserts that dealing with past abuses in Myanmar is essential to achieving genuine progress on peacebuilding and economic development in the country. Conflict and high levels of political repression have racked Myanmar for more than half a century. Both President Thein Sein and opposition leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi have highlighted rule of law and good governance as priorities for Myanmar alongside the development of a modern market economy and democracy.

Date published: 
Fri, 07/18/2014 - 12:57

This report asserts that dealing with past abuses in Myanmar is essential to achieving genuine progress on peacebuilding and economic development in the country. Conflict and high levels of political repression have racked Myanmar for more than half a century. Both President Thein Sein and opposition leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi have highlighted rule of law and good governance as priorities for Myanmar alongside the development of a modern market economy and democracy.

Date published: 
Fri, 07/18/2014 - 13:03

This joint report by ICTJ and the Kofi Annan Foundation explores common assumptions about why truth commissions are created in the wake of armed conflict and what factors make them more likely to succeed – or fail. It arises from a high-level symposium hosted by the two organizations in November 2013, which provided an opportunity for policy makers, practitioners, and scholars with significant experience in peacebuilding and transitional justice to discuss and reflect on truth commissions and the challenges of addressing accountability in peace negotiations. The report includes a foreword by Mr. Kofi Annan, a summary of discussions, two analytical papers, five case studies, and a set of conclusions.

Date published: 
Mon, 06/16/2014 - 11:02

This report examines the situation of impunity in Lebanon that has persisted since the 1975-1990 war through the lenses of core elements of transitional justice. It analyzes Lebanon’s past experience of ineffective transitional justice measures -- including limited domestic trials, narrowly mandated commissions of inquiry, and incomplete remedies for victims -- and their impact on Lebanese society. The report derives lessons that could help to initiate a broader accountability process in Lebanon in the interest of long-term peace and security.

Date published: 
Thu, 01/30/2014 - 08:32

This report compiles information on hundreds of incidents of serious human rights violations that occurred in Lebanon from 1975 to 2008, including mass killings, enforced disappearances, assassinations, forced displacement, and the shelling of civilian areas. It reveals patterns of violence and provides an analysis of incidents within the framework of international human rights and humanitarian law. While not an exhaustive mapping, the report is intended to serve as a key resource on which future research and investigative work can be built. Its aim is to contribute to the debate on how to break the cycle of political violence and serious violations of human rights in Lebanon and bring about accountability, the rule of law, and sustainable peace.

Date published: 
Wed, 09/11/2013 - 14:42

This report evaluates the government of Peru’s partial results in providing compensation to victims of the internal armed conflict that devastated the country from 1980 to 2000. It provides a detailed analysis of the process of implementing the Comprehensive Reparations Plan, established on the basis of recommendations made by the Commission for Truth and Reconciliation (2003). The report also reflects on the relationship between development policies and reparations in considering investment projects undertaken to date as part of the Collective Reparations Program.

Date published: 
Wed, 06/26/2013 - 14:53

This publication is intended to facilitate the process of drafting a mandate for a truth commission charged with the nonjudicial investigation of serious human rights violations. It covers the different aspects of a legal mandate that are necessary to enable an effective truth-seeking body, including: the objectives, the definition of the object of inquiry the normative, and policy orientations entrusted to the commission. It provides several examples of how laws and decrees in different countries have tackled the elements of a commission’s mandate, which are meant for illustration only, not as models to follow. The document is designed to be used by government officials, civil society activists, victims’ organizations and other stakeholders in a transitional justice process.

Date published: 
Thu, 06/13/2013 - 09:30

Based on significant field research and interviews with the Higher National de-Baathification Commission, this report focuses on Iraq’s purge of members of Saddam Hussein’s Baath Party, which is the most well-known example of large-scale and politically based dismissals in the Middle East and North Africa. The report summarizes the structure and impact of de-Baathification from 2003 to 2011. It gives unique insight into de-Baathification’s goals, framework, impact, and problems. It includes a focused look at de-Baathification in Iraq’s Ministry of Finance from 2003 to 2006 and summarizes seven key lessons for policy makers in other countries.

Date published: 
Mon, 03/04/2013 - 15:03

There is now an opportunity to design and implement a reparations program for victims of human rights and humanitarian law violations in Uganda. As with other countries emerging from conflict, the contours of a Ugandan reparations policy have been the subject of extended debate and generated high expectations. While the government has embarked on several reconstruction, recovery, humanitarian, and development programs for the north and other conflict-affected parts of the country, these programs were explicitly motivated by stabilization, development, and poverty-reduction objectives, rather than justice and reparations goals. This report examines approaches for identifying and categorizing victims, defining benefits and beneficiaries, and sequencing the delivery of reparations, offering guidance in assessing how the needs of the most vulnerable victims can be met and what long-term capacities must be put in place to implement a comprehensive reparations program.

Date published: 
Thu, 12/20/2012 - 15:51

The International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ), in cooperation with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), with support from the Governments of Denmark and South Africa, and in close consultation with the Assembly of States Parties to the Rome Statute (ASP), held a high-level retreat on “Supporting Complementarity at the National Level: From Theory to Practice,” at the Greentree Estate, in Manhasset, New York, on October 25 and 26, 2012. This report provides a summary of the principal discussions at the retreat without attributing views to individual participants.

Date published: 
Fri, 11/30/2012 - 13:26

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