Institutional Reform

On January 14, 2011, Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, the dictator who had ruled over Tunisia since 1987, was ousted from office by popular demonstrations led by young people eager to assert their political and economic rights. Five years later, Tunisia is the only country to emerge from the Arab Spring by transitioning to democracy, but waning political support and a restrictive climate fueled by fears of terrorism have endangered efforts to address its history of human rights abuses.

Twenty years after the end of the war, the legacy of atrocities committed during the conflict continues to shape Bosnia’s present and the future. The long form multimedia piece “Flowers in the Square” depicts the struggle of citizens of Prijedor, a community devastated by violence in 1992, to overcome this legacy and the continued denial perpetrated by the political establishment in the ongoing war for the truth about the past.

11/17/2015

In this podcast, ICTJ Senior Research Associate Roger Duthie, former Senior Research Associate Clara Ramírez-Barat, and UNICEF Peacebuilding Program Manager Friedrich Affolter discuss the joint ICTJ-UNICEF research project on “Education and Transitional Justice: Opportunities and Challenges for Peacebuilding.”

6/30/2015

In this edition of ICTJ Dispatch, Ruben Carranza, Director of ICTJ’s Reparations Program, reports on his recent mission to Myanmar. The country, slowly transitioning from a military dictatorship to a civil democracy, has failed to live up to many of the expectations for change and reform. Transitional justice measures, in particular, have failed to materialize, despite some initial steps to hold the government, the military, and elites accountable.

6/23/2015

ICTJ Dispatch is a podcast series to present expert political, social, and legal analysis of recent developments in transitional societies. In this edition, Eduardo Gonzalez, Director of Truth and Memory Program, who reports on his recent mission to Sri Lanka.

1/29/2015

The film highlights the need to reform the law enforcement body in light of its history of human rights violations and stresses the vital role civil society plays in building a trustworthy and accountable police force for Kenya.

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