In Focus


Sixteen practitioners participated in the Intensive Course on Transitional Justice and Peace Processes held in New York from March 5 to March 9, 2018. Participants included leaders in their respective fields, including human rights law, community justice and legal services, peacebuilding, education, and humanitarian affairs. Selected course presentations, led by ICTJ experts and other specialists in the field, delved into cases of current, recent, and paradigmatic peace processes and questions of justice within a comparative context.


In recent months, the crisis in the Central African Republic (CAR) that erupted five years ago has seemed farther than ever from resolution. A new report by ICTJ, I Am 100% Central African: Identity and Inclusion in the Experience of Central African Muslim Refugees in Chad and Cameroon, offers important insights on how a higher political commitment to inclusion could help transform a volatile rebuilding process into a sustainable peace.


A new ICTJ paper released today challenges the notion that criminal prosecution is the sole use for documentation of violations in Syria. Titled "Justice for Syrian Victims Beyond Trials", it urges the international community, human rights groups and Syrian civil society organizations to use the tools at their disposal to pursue overlooked avenues towards justice. These include the search for the truth, public acknowledgement of violations, and laying the foundation for future truth-seeking and truth-telling processes or reparations process.


Societies seeking to grapple with the past have much to gain by speaking with young people about their experiences and ideas more effectively. But by the same token, they have a responsibility to gather those statements in a way that both protects and respects youth voices. We sat down with Valerie Waters, author of a new report on taking statements from young people, to discuss the guide and clear up common misconceptions about the statement-taking process.


On March 22, Syrian victims and activists will gather in Geneva, Switzerland for a public hearing-style event examining the impact of the destruction of schools in the context of the Syrian conflict. The event will be hosted by the International Center for Transitional Justice and the ten Syrian organizations that together comprise the Save Syrian Schools project. A livestream will be available.


Given the positive feedback and enormous interest in the Intensive Course on Transitional Justice and Peace Processes held in Barcelona in October 2017, ICTJ is hosting a similar course in New York in March 2018. The course will continue to focus on practical examples of current, recent, or paradigmatic peace processes where the question of justice formed a significant part of the negotiating context.