In Focus

On the International Day for the Right to the Truth and 35 years after the assassination of Archbishop Oscar Romero, ICTJ Vice President Paul Seils explains why the pursuit of the truth is not a second-best option in the absence of other remedies: it is the most basic requirement of taking seriously the dignity of victims.

A major new report from ICTJ canvasses 31 countries to see how the crime of enforced disappearance affects women, as both the disappeared and the female relatives of the disappeared. It finds that across cultures, women face serious barriers to seeking relief due to discriminatory laws and practices.

In recognition of International Women’s Day, our experts on Gender Justice have identified eight of the many ways in which women’s lives are affected by disappearances.

President Jacob Zuma risks irreparably damaging the credibility of core elements of South Africa's deal with the victims of apartheid with his current plan to pardon 149 serious offenders and to potentially consider another 926 applications which are before him. Such a move would mark a profound breach of trust with the victims and South African society at large.

ICTJ releases of three short documentaries about the work of civil society organizations in Colombia intent on revealing the truth about the impact of the country's armed conflict.

As peace talks advance between the Government of Colombia and the FARC guerilla group, an essential element of negotiations is how best to examine the truth about violence and abuses committed during the armed conflict. On February 25, 2015, the International Center for Transitional Justice and the Kofi Annan Foundation will host a conference in Bogotá, titled “Truth Commissions and Peace Processes: International Experiences and Challenges for Colombia.”