Briefing Paper

12/7/2015

This briefing paper calls on the soon-to-be-established NLD-led Burmese government to seriously consider taking steps to deal with Myanmar’s troubled past as a way to help end the cycle of violence and human rights violations in the conflict-torn country.

Date published: 
Wed, 12/09/2015 - 09:09

10/27/2015

This paper examines the unique, enduring consequences of conflict-related sexual violence in northern Uganda, focusing specifically on the impact of the lack of accountability for sexual crimes leading to motherhood on girls and women, and on the children they bore as a result of violations.

Date published: 
Tue, 10/27/2015 - 10:25

9/28/2015

This briefing paper details and analyzes the progress made so far in Tunisia to implement its historic Transitional Justice Law, with a particular focus on the Truth and Dignity Commission, created one year ago.

Date published: 
Mon, 09/28/2015 - 07:44

7/17/2015

This briefing paper summarizes the findings of an ICTJ report (by the same name) on the judicial response to international crimes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It makes substantive recommendations to justice stakeholders in the DRC on how to advance prosecutions of international crimes in domestic courts, based on the finding that the number of open investigations related to serious crimes remains very low compared to the magnitude of atrocities committed in the DRC.

Date published: 
Fri, 07/17/2015 - 08:50

7/17/2015

This briefing paper summarizes the findings of an ICTJ report (by the same name) on the judicial response to international crimes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It makes substantive recommendations to justice stakeholders in the DRC on how to advance prosecutions of international crimes in domestic courts, based on the finding that the number of open investigations related to serious crimes remains very low compared to the magnitude of atrocities committed in the DRC.

Date published: 
Fri, 07/17/2015 - 08:29

6/15/2015

The government of Uganda has been slow to address and remedy serious human rights abuses committed against civilians throughout the country, despite its commitment under the Juba peace talks. This paper analyzes some of the underlying factors that seem to impede the implementation of transitional justice measures in Uganda, such as waning political support and an overly bureaucratic process, and offers practical recommendations on how to advance the process.

Date published: 
Mon, 06/15/2015 - 15:16

6/2/2015

This paper weighs the possible modes and competing policy objectives of punishing FARC members for serious crimes in the context of Colombia’s ongoing peace negotiations. It argues that punishment has to occur in a way that does not damage one of the underlying objectives of the peace process, transforming the FARC from an insurgent group into a political actor.

Date published: 
Tue, 06/02/2015 - 15:12

3/17/2015

This briefing paper is the summary of “The Disappeared and the Invisible: Revealing the Enduring Impact of Enforced Disappearances on Women,” a comprehensive study by ICTJ that identifies the impacts and government responses to enforced disappearances as they relate to women in 31 countries. It answers two key questions: 1) How Do Enforced Disappearances Impact Women? and 2) How Can and Do Transitional Justice Mechanisms Respond? Its eight key recommendations are intended to help governments design programs and set up institutions to successfully address the enduring impact on women victims and their communities.

Date published: 
Sun, 03/15/2015 (All day)

1/22/2015

This paper describes proceedings in Uganda’s national courts against Thomas Kwoyelo, a former mid-level commander of the Lord’s Resistance Army, for war crimes and crimes against humanity. It analyzes the opportunities and challenges for the prosecution of serious crimes in Uganda and concludes with recommendations to enhance accountability in the country. In particular, it recommends that Uganda’s Amnesty Act of 2000 be repealed or amended to exclude individuals who bear responsibility for international crimes.

Date published: 
Thu, 01/22/2015 - 12:19

11/18/2014

This briefing paper analyzes and reflects on the development of the ICC prosecutor’s strategy and application of procedural rules, since operations began at the International Criminal Court more than a decade ago. The mixed results of the court’s first cases, which arise from the situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, underscore that the ICC, as a complementary forum, is not mandated to investigate and prosecute all international crimes. National courts must step in. The paper recommends, among other reforms, that the court explore new ways to adapt the Rules of Procedure and Evidence to take into consideration the important role and participation of civil society.

Date published: 
Mon, 09/01/2014 - 13:31

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