Research Brief

4/20/2011

After periods of extended political conflict and of repression or state terrorism, there is an active political struggle about the meaning of what occurred. This paper illustrates some processes through which silenced or hidden ethnic, cultural or gender dimensions come to light during the unfolding of violent conflicts and factor into remembrance in the aftermath of conflict.

Date published: 
Mon, 06/01/2009 - 14:47

4/20/2011

The focus of this paper is on initiatives of DDR, SSR, and transitional justice as they relate in peacebuilding contexts. This paper considers the connection between the three types of initiatives: first, by exploring the relationship between DDR and transitional justice; second, by examining the links between DDR and SSR; and third, by considering the connections between transitional justice and SSR.

Date published: 
Mon, 02/01/2010 - 14:43

4/20/2011

Local justice is sometimes presented as an alternative to or substitute for other measures of transitional justice, often due to political, cultural, or practical considerations. This chapter argues that local justice addresses the (comparatively neglected) reintegration aspect of DDR programs more directly, quickly, and efficiently than other transitional justice measures. It examines how local justice processes can best complement DDR efforts without foreclosing other transitional justice measures.

Date published: 
Mon, 02/01/2010 - 14:41

4/20/2011

Little has been written about the relationship between transitional justice measures and DDR programs with respect to child ex-combatants. We argue that the primary avenue through which transitional justice measures may positively affect the reintegration of former child combatants is likely to be their potential impact on receiving communities. Potential negative effects, however, are important and should not be overlooked.

Date published: 
Mon, 02/01/2010 - 13:49

4/20/2011

This chapter examines the largely overlooked relationship between female ex-combatants, DDR, and transitional justice, with a particular focus on truth commissions. The potential of truth commissions to recognize women’s multiple and contradictory roles during armed conflict and to publicly acknowledge their agency and experience can contribute to a reconsideration of postconflict gender relations.

Date published: 
Mon, 02/01/2010 - 13:48

4/20/2011

The general aim of this paper is to construct an argument about the advisability of drawing links between disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) and reparations programs, but not just because this is better from the standpoint of justice. It can be argued that the security-related aims of DDR are also facilitated by establishing links between these programs and justice measures.

Date published: 
Mon, 02/01/2010 - 13:45

4/20/2011

Generally, disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) programs and truth commissions have operated independently of one another. This has resulted in missed opportunities for strengthening DDR and truth commissions. DDR’s reintegration aims may be furthered by increased truth-telling, and from the perspective of truth commissions, ex-combatants are often key witnesses. Aggregated data from DDR programs can also aid in documenting the larger causes and patterns of violence.

Date published: 
Mon, 02/01/2010 - 13:44

4/20/2011

Disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) programs and prosecutions of international crimes have become prominent features in the landscape of postconflict states. Some tension between them is inherent. Nonetheless, there is compatibility in the larger, long-term goals of DDR and prosecutions: both aim at reestablishing trust among ex-combatants, victims, the broader community, and state authorities.

Date published: 
Mon, 02/01/2010 - 13:42

4/20/2011

This paper’s principal aim is to provide a cogent analytical framework on the range of possible or ideal relationships between DDR programs and amnesties. It assesses whether and how amnesties can serve to maximize the effectiveness of a DDR program, while doing the least harm possible to the transitional justice values of truth, justice, reparation, and reform, which arguably contribute to the effective reintegration of ex-combatants and hence to the durability of peace in the long term.

Date published: 
Mon, 02/01/2010 - 13:41

4/20/2011

Essential among South Africa's transition programs was a process to disarm, demobilize, and reintegrate ex-combatants and to create a new defense force integrating the armed forces of opposing parties into a united military structure. Yet, DDR remained largely independent from other transitional initiatives, including transitional justice measures, such as the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC).

Date published: 
Mon, 06/01/2009 - 13:25

Pages