• Date published: 1/1/2008

    Truth Commissions II

    Author: ICTJ

    Of the more than 30 truth commissions created since the 1980s, four that were organized in Africa and the Americas are notably good examples of how circumstances in each society helped shape the commissions’ work.

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  • Date published: 1/1/2008

    Truth Commissions

    Author: ICTJ

    More than 30 countries have created truth commissions to investigate and report on human rights abuses. These commissions of inquiry help seek recognition for victims and promote possibilities for peace, reconciliation and democracy.

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  • Date published: 1/1/2008

    Serbia: Submission to the Universal Periodic Review of the UN Human Rights Council

    Author: ICTJ

    The application of transitional justice mechanisms, such as war crimes trials and reparations, has significant flaws in Serbia. Lack of progress may be even greater in truth-seeking and vetting of public officials. Serbia must do much more in all areas of transitional justice, for its own sake and the sake of long-term regional stability.

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  • Date published: 1/1/2008

    The War Crimes Chamber in Bosnia and Herzegovina: From Hybrid to Domestic Court

    Author: ICTJ; Bogdan Ivanisevic

    The War Crimes Chamber of the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina, which began its work 9 March 2005, has been the most significant national effort in Bosnia and Herzegovina to investigate and prosecute persons allegedly involved in serious violations of international law during the 1992–1995 conflict. It also has given the legal community useful experience with a “hybrid” court in which international and national judges serve together.

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  • Date published: 1/1/2008

    Accountability and Peace for the DRC

    Author: ICTJ

    Two years after the Democratic Republic of Congo held its first elections since independence, the country is at a crossroads. One of the key challenges facing the DRC today is the question of how the country will address the massive human rights atrocities of its recent past to establish a foundation for peace and security, the rule of law and respect for human rights to prevail in the future.

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  • Date published: 1/1/2008

    Transitional Justice in Colombia

    Author: ICTJ

    In Colombia, the shifting boundaries between drug trafficking and political crime and the tension between security and human rights pose particular challenges for those seeking accountability for past abuses and respect for human rights.

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  • Date published: 1/1/2008

    Canada's TRC: Special Challenges

    Author: ICTJ

    Indigenous populations throughout the world are widely recognized as groups affected by political and economic marginalization. Countries that have used truth commissions to examine patterns of exclusion—including Chile, Guatemala and Peru—have found clear links between racism, political marginalization, economic exclusion and violence. The Canadian TRC might benefit from exploring these lessons as it carries its work forward.

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  • Date published: 1/1/2008

    Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission

    Author: ICTJ

    As the first national truth commission to be created in an established democracy, Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) is a bold experiment. It is also the first TRC to focus exclusively on crimes committed against children and indigenous groups.

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  • Date published: 12/1/2007

    Negotiating peace in Sierra Leone: Confronting the justice challenge

    Author: ICTJ, Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue; Priscilla Hayner

    This report focuses the Lomé Accord of 1999, that ended the Sierra Leone's 10 year civil war. It examines the negotiation dynamics influencing its creation and the impact of the accord from 1999 to 2007. The peace accord is often remembered for its unconditional amnesty provisions, which met strong international condemnation. However, it seems that the origin and its impact of the amnesty have not been well understood - and was determined by the incontestable political and military realities of the time.

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  • Date published: 12/1/2007

    When the War Ends: Peace, Justice, and Social Reconstruction in Northern Uganda

    Author: ICTJ, Human Rights Center, Payson Center for International Development

    This report compares findings from two population-based surveys (in 2005 and 2007) in districts of northern Uganda most affected by 21 years of conflict, including the Acholi districts. The studies capture attitudes about peace, justice, and social reconstruction. Developing a deeper understanding of the needs and desires of affected populations is crucial for long-term conflict resolution.

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