• Featured
    Date published: 2/14/2018

    Pursuing Truth, Justice, and Redress in Nepal

    Author: Elena Naughton

    Over a decade since the end of conflict in Nepal, the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) continues to support victims in their demands for justice, acknowledgment, reparations, and reform. While the Government of Nepal has established two commissions-the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) and the Commission of Investigation on Enforced Disappeared Persons (CIEDP)-to advance these rights, neither commission is close to fulfilling its mandate, although both have been operating for about three years.

    The ICTJ continues to support human rights victims in Nepal in their pursuit of justice, truth, reparations, and institutional reform. This briefing paper presents a summary of findings and recommendations from workshops that ICTJ conducted with women victims, as well as meetings it held with human rights groups in Nepal in November 2017.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 2/1/2018

    Listening to Young Voices: A Guide to Interviewing Children and Young People in Truth Seeking and Documentation Efforts

    Author: Valerie Waters

    As human rights advocates and state representatives increasingly acknowledge the necessity of involving children in truth-seeking processes, there is a growing need for practical tools that facilitate children’s participation while prioritizing their protection. This statement-taking protocol provides a framework for interviewing children who have expressed a desire to recount their experiences to truth-seeking and documentation efforts, outlining protection principles, inquiry strategies, and behavioral guidelines for interacting with children. This protocol is intended to help advance effective responses to human rights violations committed against children in the context of armed conflict and oppressive rule; however, the techniques and guidelines contained herein are not themselves new. This tool has been developed based on decades of research and reflection from social workers, mental-health professionals, and child-protection advocates working to address child maltreatment at the individual, family, and community levels.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 12/6/2017

    Forms of Justice: A Guide to Designing Reparations Application Forms and Registration Processes for Victims of Human Rights Violations

    Author: Ruben Carranza, Cristián Correa, and Elena Naughton

    In a number of countries around the world, governments have created state-administered reparations programs for victims and communities that were most affected by massive human rights violations. The success of these programs, which often involve thousands of individuals, depends in part on the state’s ability to reach victims and record their demands for justice in an effective and meaningful way. Reparations programs may be administered by government agencies pursuant to a law or policy or a court judgment. In all cases, a process of identifying, verifying, and registering those entitled to reparations is necessary. This often begins with a reparations application form.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 12/4/2017

    Studies on Transitional Justice in Context: Addressing Corruption Through Justice-Sensitive Security Sector Reform

    Author: James Cohen

    Corruption is often uncritically assumed to be part of the way things work in transitional and post-conflict countries. Corruption is even argued to be beneficial to development, in that it “greases the wheels of bureaucracy” and gets things done. Under pressure to establish short-term stability in post-conflict settings, peace-builders and negotiators will sometimes make deals with the power brokers who started the conflict, shopping out political positions and control over state assets while turning a blind eye to questionable control of public funds.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 11/21/2017

    Failure to Reform: A Critique of Police Vetting in Kenya

    Author: Christopher Gitari Ndungú

    For decades, Kenyans have yearned for a police service that is accountable to the people and adheres to national laws and international human rights standards. The police stand accused of regularly meting out violence on the public, extra-judicial killings, and other human rights violations which are very rarely investigated or the perpetrators brought to account. The police further stand accused of abetting corruption, resulting in a debilitating impact on public trust. After the deadly crisis that followed the 2007 elections, where hundreds of Kenyans were killed as a result of excessive use of force by law enforcement, reforming the police became a national priority.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 11/16/2017

    Strengthening Rule of Law, Accountability, and Acknowledgment in Haiti

    Author: Cristián Correa

    A new paper looks at the United Nations newly established mission in Haiti, examining its work. How will it seek to contribute to state and civil society efforts to effectively address challenges to stability, the rule of law, and corruption?

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  • Featured
    Date published: 10/18/2017

    “The War As I See It:” Youth Perceptions and Knowledge of the Lebanese Civil War

    Author: Nour El Bejjani Noureddine

    Civil war in Lebanon ended in 1990, but its impact resonates today. How do young people understand the conflict, and how does it continue to shape their lives? A group of young photographers explored these questions through ICTJ's "The War as I See It" photo gallery. This publication presents the findings of that project. It showed that the generation born after 1990 lacks basic information about the war and that the young people who participated had a genuine curiosity to learn about and reflect on the war. Academics and experts who participated in the discussions expressed the importance of promoting knowledge and discussion of the civil war and its causes among young people, in order to build durable peace and prevent the recurrence of violence.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 6/28/2017

    The Place of Reconciliation in Transitional Justice

    Author: Paul Seils

    The term reconciliation has long been associated with the field of transitional justice and is often presumed to be one of its goals. At the same time, reconciliation has been both controversial and vague as a concept, giving rise to different understandings and approaches. This paper presents possible understandings of the concept of reconciliation as well as its relationship to the field of transitional justice.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 6/9/2017

    Not Without Dignity: Views of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon on Displacement, Conditions of Return, and Coexistence

    Author: Rim El Gantri and Karim El Mufti

    Discussions about a future return of refugees and coexistence among groups currently at war in Syria must begin now.

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  • Featured
    Date published: 5/23/2017

    "We Cannot Forget": Truth and Memory in Post-Conflict Nepal

    There is widespread misunderstanding of transitional justice in Nepal, and relevant policy is often motivated by the interests of political leaders and other powerful actors, like the Nepal Army, with little regard for the rights and needs of victims. This report, a collaboration between ICTJ and the Nepali NGO Martin Chautari, aims to broaden the understanding and awareness of what truth in transitional justice in Nepal actually means for diverse sets of stakeholders.

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